Applications

Please find here the approved applications to the Social Art Award 2021 – New Greening. The open call was closed on 1 May.

The winner(s) of this year’s edition will be announced soon. Save the date for the Award Ceremony: 25 June, 3:30 – 7:30 pm CET.

 

Previous photoNext photo
36
Social Distance through Dance
by River
174
Contest is finished!
https://social-art-award.org/application-award-2021?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=2634
36
174
Title:
Social Distance through Dance

Author:
River

Description:
This project is an exploration on social distancing, through dance, movement and sustainability. I hope to address our current social restrictions, and offer a sustainable solution to represent hope for the future. I had become incredible anxious from constantly thinking about distancing myself, that I wanted to make something that would spark joy, while still keeping people socially distant. I decided to focus on a costume that I could create for dancing, as a homage to the freedom of movement we had lost, and were trying to regain in a world devoid of it. I made two costumes, so that the added distance between the dancers was 1.5 meters. I was inspired by Carnival costumes that are worn on J’ouvert every year during the carnival in Antigua. I was also inspired by the Lionfish, and wanted to copy the mobility of its fins. I had swam with the invasive species many times, and wanted to replicate its colours and the way it moved. I wanted my costumes to be completely biodegradable, as many carnival costumes are only used once and then thrown away. I also wanted to source from the environment around me, and used palm fronds to create the first costume. I weaved them together (a common Caribbean practice) to create a harness, and built the rest of the costume outwards. As I had created the first costume from the land, I wanted to create the second from the sea. I found a fishing net that had washed up, and created a harness using it, and then attached sea-fans to it, almost as if the reef was growing outwards from the base I had made. I used biodegradable string to construct both costumes, so they could both be disassembled, and the materials could be returned to nature after the costumes had been worn. My father photographed my sisters and I dancing in the costumes, demonstrating that even though we must stay socially distant, we can use these new restrictions as inspiration, creating joy in a time where it is much needed. I hope this project can inspire more social art, and the ability to create sustainably.
Description:
This project is an exploration on social distancing, through dance, movement and sustainability. I hope to address our current social restrictions, and offer a sustainable solution to represent hope for the future. I had become incredible anxious from constantly thinking about distancing myself, that I wanted to make something that would spark joy, while still keeping people socially distant. I decided to focus on a costume that I could create for dancing, as a homage to the freedom of movement we had lost, and were trying to regain in a world devoid of it. I made two costumes, so that the added distance between the dancers was 1.5 meters. I was inspired by Carnival costumes that are worn on J’ouvert every year during the carnival in Antigua. I was also inspired by the Lionfish, and wanted to copy the mobility of its fins. I had swam with the invasive species many times, and wanted to replicate its colours and the way it moved. I wanted my costumes to be completely biodegradable, as many carnival costumes are only used once and then thrown away. I also wanted to source from the environment around me, and used palm fronds to create the first costume. I weaved them together (a common Caribbean practice) to create a harness, and built the rest of the costume outwards. As I had created the first costume from the land, I wanted to create the second from the sea. I found a fishing net that had washed up, and created a harness using it, and then attached sea-fans to it, almost as if the reef was growing outwards from the base I had made. I used biodegradable string to construct both costumes, so they could both be disassembled, and the materials could be returned to nature after the costumes had been worn. My father photographed my sisters and I dancing in the costumes, demonstrating that even though we must stay socially distant, we can use these new restrictions as inspiration, creating joy in a time where it is much needed. I hope this project can inspire more social art, and the ability to create sustainably.

What is Social Art?

Organizer

Organizer

Partner

Partner

Support our Work

Support our Work