Award 2019

The Open Call for the Social Art Award 2019 under the topic “We are the People – Peaceful Revolutions” was closed on December 15, 2019. We are very impressed by 558 submissions that were contributed by artists coming from 65 countries across all continents. 

The winners of The Social Art Award 2019 are Narcissa Gold (USA), Melinda Mouzannar (Lebanon) and Bogna Grazyna (Poland/Germany). The Honorary Mention goes to Kingson Kin Sing Chan (Hong Kong/UK). 

Below you find the artworks, that passed the initial jury round. The public voting took place till 30 December and is a tool to give more public visibility to the topic and the artworks. It does not replace the final jury judgment. There were two wildcards for the most voted artworks that entered the final shortlist

The focus diversity of applications shows that artists are active in the multi-faceted fields of socially engaged art reflecting on wars, genocides, femicides, traumata, violence against refugees, children, women, men, disabled people, LGBTIQs, animals. They share feelings for the planet and its living species, but also showing hopelessness due to complex crises be it climate change (e.g. in regard to water pollution), capitalism, corruption, a violation against human rights, nature, protected national parks. Many of the artists are constantly trying to give a voice to the poorest or empower unheard social groups.

It’s not only about peaceful revolutions, but it’s also about feeling a deep connection and showing love and respect for each other.
Thank you all for sharing your great and inspirational work and look at all the great contributions!

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178
La Gran Nación Wayuu - Archivo de Música Original
by Juan Chao
Category: open category
1296
Contest is finished!
https://social-art-award.org/award2019?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=1046
178
1296
Title:
La Gran Nación Wayuu - Archivo de Música Original

Author:
Juan Chao

Category:
open category

Description:
The indigenous Wayuu ethnic group lives in the northernmost territory of Latin America (Colombia-Venezuela border). Currently the Wayuu are at risk of physical and cultural extinction. Drug trafficking, the largest open-pit mega mining in the world (Cerrejón), the expansion of cell phone use and the consumption of Western culture result in the abandonment of ancestral customs within their own members. For this reason I carried out a project to preserve the native Wayuu music linking new technologies and forms of production with the ancestral knowledge of Wayuu. I performed three actions: -A Wayuu traditional music educational tool -The opening of the First Indigenous Music Sampling Study -A 35-minute album where the relationship between new technologies (samplers, synthesizers) and traditional Wayuu music is explored This image constitutes the basic and main interface of the educational tool (www.archivodemusicaoriginal.com), a music file available on the internet where you can access each of the Wayuu musical instruments to know their uses, the correct way to play them and videos showing step by step how to build them. The Wayuu youth are forced to leave their territory for health reasons arising from pollution and lack of natural resources generated by the activity of coal extraction, or by criminal acts related to drug trafficking and paramilitarism. The old Wayuu Musical Teachers have no one to transmit their ancestral knowledge, schools with children are distributed throughout the desert where they live and the elderly cannot attend classrooms to instruct students. The creation of this educational tool, wher children and teachers can access to traditional musical knowledge is a direct action for the safeguarding of Wayuu ancestral knowledge. In my last stay in the territory I also gave workshops to ethnoeducators of the indigenous group to instruct them in the management of the tool that is applied throughout the territory today. The image is an isometric perspective pixogram where you can see the characteristic features of the Great Wayuu Nation, the main characters and activities, and also part of their worldview and beliefs. The image was made entirely by me over a period of one year and was inspired by the Wayuu fabrics made by the weaving women of the ethnic group. Women knit point by point until they reach the desired piece. In the same way this digital image was created, pixel by pixel by hand. Some aspects that should be mentioned: This image and the educational tool that derives from it is accompanied by the opening of the First Study of Indigenous Music Sampling and by the album composed, recorded and produced in the territory. The First Indigenous Music Sampling Study was installed by me within the territory and is still active today. In the study I taught young Wayuu how to use Samplers and multitrack recording programs to create beats by sampling their native instruments. The study also functions as a new instance of interaction with the Elderly Musical Masters. The album explores the relationship between traditional Wayuu music and new composition technologies. It was performed in combination with the Wayuu Musical Masters respecting each and every one of the own musical parameters. When emigrating, the youngest, quickly abandon their traditions and in most cases hide their belonging to the indigenous group. They see their own ancestral traditions as something outdated or useless. The objective of this action is to provide new cultural content to the youngest, offering new compositions and ways of composing with their traditional music. How can art catalyze change?: This project represented through the image “The Great Wayuu Nation - Original Music Archive” is a transformation tool to combat the processes of cultural erosion that the Wayuu indigenous group currently lives. The educational tool is being used to teach traditional music to children and young people in the ethno-schools of the territory. This contribution not only represents a contribution to traditional musical Wayuu, it is also a contribution to the transmission of fundamental cultural values. The project also proposes the generation of new local cultural content from traditional knowledge. The relationship with new technologies is a fundamental element highlighted by the members of the community. From my point of view, the inclusion and construction of a new world implies above all, the right to the recognition of the cultural values of minority populations. We must perceive disadvantaged people as the objective of social and inclusion policies, but also the richness of their culture must be recognized and known. In the case of the Wayuu indigenous group there are endless values and customs that I highlight. Its own normative system that provides the presence of the "Palabrero" (person specialized in mediation and conflict resolution between clans), the absolute respect for nature and its resources, the very important value that is given to women within the ethnic group (matriarchal and matrilineal), and the respect for the word and dialogue, represent some of its main characteristics. All these elements and more are learned by the young Wayuu through musical learning. Because Wayuu music is fundamentally executed for a specific purpose, although there are touches and instruments used for a recreational or social purpose, the vast majority of its musical universe perfectly describes the fundamental elements of its own culture. In this way, the project I carried out contributes fundamentally to the appropriation and valuation of a large part of the Wayuu culture and its worldview. This image works as the summary of the entire project
Description:
The indigenous Wayuu ethnic group lives in the northernmost territory of Latin America (Colombia-Venezuela border). Currently the Wayuu are at risk of physical and cultural extinction. Drug trafficking, the largest open-pit mega mining in the world (Cerrejón), the expansion of cell phone use and the consumption of Western culture result in the abandonment of ancestral customs within their own members. For this reason I carried out a project to preserve the native Wayuu music linking new technologies and forms of production with the ancestral knowledge of Wayuu. I performed three actions: -A Wayuu traditional music educational tool -The opening of the First Indigenous Music Sampling Study -A 35-minute album where the relationship between new technologies (samplers, synthesizers) and traditional Wayuu music is explored This image constitutes the basic and main interface of the educational tool (www.archivodemusicaoriginal.com), a music file available on the internet where you can access each of the Wayuu musical instruments to know their uses, the correct way to play them and videos showing step by step how to build them. The Wayuu youth are forced to leave their territory for health reasons arising from pollution and lack of natural resources generated by the activity of coal extraction, or by criminal acts related to drug trafficking and paramilitarism. The old Wayuu Musical Teachers have no one to transmit their ancestral knowledge, schools with children are distributed throughout the desert where they live and the elderly cannot attend classrooms to instruct students. The creation of this educational tool, wher children and teachers can access to traditional musical knowledge is a direct action for the safeguarding of Wayuu ancestral knowledge. In my last stay in the territory I also gave workshops to ethnoeducators of the indigenous group to instruct them in the management of the tool that is applied throughout the territory today. The image is an isometric perspective pixogram where you can see the characteristic features of the Great Wayuu Nation, the main characters and activities, and also part of their worldview and beliefs. The image was made entirely by me over a period of one year and was inspired by the Wayuu fabrics made by the weaving women of the ethnic group. Women knit point by point until they reach the desired piece. In the same way this digital image was created, pixel by pixel by hand. Some aspects that should be mentioned: This image and the educational tool that derives from it is accompanied by the opening of the First Study of Indigenous Music Sampling and by the album composed, recorded and produced in the territory. The First Indigenous Music Sampling Study was installed by me within the territory and is still active today. In the study I taught young Wayuu how to use Samplers and multitrack recording programs to create beats by sampling their native instruments. The study also functions as a new instance of interaction with the Elderly Musical Masters. The album explores the relationship between traditional Wayuu music and new composition technologies. It was performed in combination with the Wayuu Musical Masters respecting each and every one of the own musical parameters. When emigrating, the youngest, quickly abandon their traditions and in most cases hide their belonging to the indigenous group. They see their own ancestral traditions as something outdated or useless. The objective of this action is to provide new cultural content to the youngest, offering new compositions and ways of composing with their traditional music. How can art catalyze change?: This project represented through the image “The Great Wayuu Nation - Original Music Archive” is a transformation tool to combat the processes of cultural erosion that the Wayuu indigenous group currently lives. The educational tool is being used to teach traditional music to children and young people in the ethno-schools of the territory. This contribution not only represents a contribution to traditional musical Wayuu, it is also a contribution to the transmission of fundamental cultural values. The project also proposes the generation of new local cultural content from traditional knowledge. The relationship with new technologies is a fundamental element highlighted by the members of the community. From my point of view, the inclusion and construction of a new world implies above all, the right to the recognition of the cultural values of minority populations. We must perceive disadvantaged people as the objective of social and inclusion policies, but also the richness of their culture must be recognized and known. In the case of the Wayuu indigenous group there are endless values and customs that I highlight. Its own normative system that provides the presence of the "Palabrero" (person specialized in mediation and conflict resolution between clans), the absolute respect for nature and its resources, the very important value that is given to women within the ethnic group (matriarchal and matrilineal), and the respect for the word and dialogue, represent some of its main characteristics. All these elements and more are learned by the young Wayuu through musical learning. Because Wayuu music is fundamentally executed for a specific purpose, although there are touches and instruments used for a recreational or social purpose, the vast majority of its musical universe perfectly describes the fundamental elements of its own culture. In this way, the project I carried out contributes fundamentally to the appropriation and valuation of a large part of the Wayuu culture and its worldview. This image works as the summary of the entire project

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