Award 2019

The Open Call for the Social Art Award 2019 under the topic “We are the People – Peaceful Revolutions” was closed on December 15, 2019. We are very impressed by 558 submissions that were contributed by artists coming from 65 countries across all continents. 

The winners of The Social Art Award 2019 are Narcissa Gold (USA), Melinda Mouzannar (Lebanon) and Bogna Grazyna (Poland/Germany). The Honorary Mention goes to Kingson Kin Sing Chan (Hong Kong/UK). 

Below you find the artworks, that passed the initial jury round. The public voting took place till 30 December and is a tool to give more public visibility to the topic and the artworks. It does not replace the final jury judgment. There were two wildcards for the most voted artworks that entered the final shortlist

The focus diversity of applications shows that artists are active in the multi-faceted fields of socially engaged art reflecting on wars, genocides, femicides, traumata, violence against refugees, children, women, men, disabled people, LGBTIQs, animals. They share feelings for the planet and its living species, but also showing hopelessness due to complex crises be it climate change (e.g. in regard to water pollution), capitalism, corruption, a violation against human rights, nature, protected national parks. Many of the artists are constantly trying to give a voice to the poorest or empower unheard social groups.

It’s not only about peaceful revolutions, but it’s also about feeling a deep connection and showing love and respect for each other.
Thank you all for sharing your great and inspirational work and look at all the great contributions!

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The Ecocyde of Lura - How Albania lost the centurial...
by Ajet Rira
Category: open category
365
Contest is finished!
https://social-art-award.org/award2019?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=1243
140
365
Title:
The Ecocyde of Lura - How Albania lost the centurial...

Author:
Ajet Rira

Category:
open category

Description:
In less than 25 years, significant, uncontrolled, illicit deforestation activity has taken place in most forests across Albania at a pace of 2-4 times higher than the natural forestation pace. Such illicitly obtained wood has served to furnish most furniture producers, and international markets with rare old beech tree beams, and other similarly precious woods. As a result, Albania is left with less than 1% of its old beech forests compared to the 7% ten years ago. Furthermore, it ranks among the least forested countries in Europe, and the Western Balkan region, with only 27% of its territory comprising of forests. Given the pressure by environmentalists, both local and international, the Government of Albania declared a “Moratorium on Forests” in 2016, severely “restricting” any cutting/deforestation activity. Fresh logs and piles of centurial beech cut into firewood, are part of the current reality in Lura as we speak. In an attempt to document and expose the scope and focus of this forest ecocide. How can art catalyze change?: By documenting and exposing the scope and cost of forest ecocide in Albania through evidence-based photography, in an attempt to call for action and urge local Albanian people and policy-makers.
Description:
In less than 25 years, significant, uncontrolled, illicit deforestation activity has taken place in most forests across Albania at a pace of 2-4 times higher than the natural forestation pace. Such illicitly obtained wood has served to furnish most furniture producers, and international markets with rare old beech tree beams, and other similarly precious woods. As a result, Albania is left with less than 1% of its old beech forests compared to the 7% ten years ago. Furthermore, it ranks among the least forested countries in Europe, and the Western Balkan region, with only 27% of its territory comprising of forests. Given the pressure by environmentalists, both local and international, the Government of Albania declared a “Moratorium on Forests” in 2016, severely “restricting” any cutting/deforestation activity. Fresh logs and piles of centurial beech cut into firewood, are part of the current reality in Lura as we speak. In an attempt to document and expose the scope and focus of this forest ecocide. How can art catalyze change?: By documenting and exposing the scope and cost of forest ecocide in Albania through evidence-based photography, in an attempt to call for action and urge local Albanian people and policy-makers.

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