Award 2017

The Social Art Award 2017

Can art change the world?

Under this question, the Institute for Art and Innovation e.V. had launched the first Social Art Award in 2017. Artists and cultural actors of all areas were invited to apply with their work to the field of social art. Artists from 131 countries responded with extraordinary works and projects.

On September 5, 2017, the three winners Lino Tonelotto from France, Quek Jia Qi from Singapore and Diogo da Cruz from Portugal were honored, and exhibited at WHITECONCEPTS Gallery in Berlin. They demonstrated with their politically engaged works that art can make current events visible and tangible. This is an important understanding for bringing forward the debate and thus a social change.

Learn more about it and get your copy of the Social Art Award Book (116 pages, English) featuring the Top50 artists.

To Order:

Printed Version (Softcover) – 25 EUR (including delivery)

E-Version – Free

 

See here the best entries:

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10
thirty-four parking lots
by Karl Hoedl
747
Contest is finished!
http://social-art-award.org/award2017?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=453
10
747
Title:
thirty-four parking lots

Author:
Karl Hoedl

Description:
Parking lots are non-places and a consequence of our today’s mobility. Everybody who owns or uses a car needs a parking lot to park the car after arriving at the place they went. In my work I’m capturing only symptoms, the real issue is visually not present. The parking lots I have captured necessarily don’t need to be in Wels, they could be elsewhere, they are placeholders and represents parking lots per se. The automobile industry adds 90 million vehicles per year to the planet and we don’t consider the environmental damage we cause to our world. The average daily use of a car is 63 minutes, so the rest of the day the car has to be parked somewhere. I have captured all these emerging parking lots needed for the number of new cars produce every year, but I have shown them mainly vacant, to point out a future occasion which will disrupt our today’s mobility. In ten years from now I’m sure we will drive mainly autonomous, we will order our mobility via smart phone, we won’t own the car anymore. The average daily use of a vehicle will tremendously increase and we won’t need so many cars anymore. The number of new built cars will dramatically decline and impact this industry. Said that, I’m confident that than all parking lots will show a ghostly emptiness like captured in my work. Fifty years ago, Ed Ruscha published his book, thirty-four parking lots in Los Angeles. He said, when he moved from Oklahoma to Los Angeles, “The first thing that hit me was the number of people that were coming here. In the late 1950s there were something like 1000 people a day bringing in 750 cars every day. I was overwhelmed by that, and also by the smog”. I’m curious what people might say about my observation concerning mobility and future impacts in fifty years from now.
Description:
Parking lots are non-places and a consequence of our today’s mobility. Everybody who owns or uses a car needs a parking lot to park the car after arriving at the place they went. In my work I’m capturing only symptoms, the real issue is visually not present. The parking lots I have captured necessarily don’t need to be in Wels, they could be elsewhere, they are placeholders and represents parking lots per se. The automobile industry adds 90 million vehicles per year to the planet and we don’t consider the environmental damage we cause to our world. The average daily use of a car is 63 minutes, so the rest of the day the car has to be parked somewhere. I have captured all these emerging parking lots needed for the number of new cars produce every year, but I have shown them mainly vacant, to point out a future occasion which will disrupt our today’s mobility. In ten years from now I’m sure we will drive mainly autonomous, we will order our mobility via smart phone, we won’t own the car anymore. The average daily use of a vehicle will tremendously increase and we won’t need so many cars anymore. The number of new built cars will dramatically decline and impact this industry. Said that, I’m confident that than all parking lots will show a ghostly emptiness like captured in my work. Fifty years ago, Ed Ruscha published his book, thirty-four parking lots in Los Angeles. He said, when he moved from Oklahoma to Los Angeles, “The first thing that hit me was the number of people that were coming here. In the late 1950s there were something like 1000 people a day bringing in 750 cars every day. I was overwhelmed by that, and also by the smog”. I’m curious what people might say about my observation concerning mobility and future impacts in fifty years from now.

 

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