Gallery

Please find here the approved applications to the Social Art Award 2021 – New Greening. The open call was closed on 1 May.

The next Open Call for the Social Art Ward will be opened in 2023.

 

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18
Natural Cycle
by Chris Revelle
310
Contest is finished!
https://social-art-award.org/application-award-2021/?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=1610
18
310
Title:
Natural Cycle

Author:
Chris Revelle

Description:
In February of 2007, the United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its Forth Assessment Report. The report stated that the warming of the climate system is indisputable and is dependent on carbon fuel intensity of human activities. The IPCC scientists reported that the climate change was not a natural cycle of the planet and that hotter temperatures and sea level rising “would continue for centuries.” The results of human activities would be an increase in heat waves, rainfall, drought, hurricanes, and high tides. The geoscientists at Princeton and Columbia have both acknowledged the danger of glacier melting and rising sea levels. They have estimated that if Greenland or the West Antarctic ice sheets melt, sea levels could rise by 20 feet (6 m). A series of map were created to show these devastating effects of future climate change and its result on sea levels. The maps display the changing coastlines of continents, countries and islands that will be affected by the estimated 6-meter rise in the world oceans.
Description:
In February of 2007, the United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its Forth Assessment Report. The report stated that the warming of the climate system is indisputable and is dependent on carbon fuel intensity of human activities. The IPCC scientists reported that the climate change was not a natural cycle of the planet and that hotter temperatures and sea level rising “would continue for centuries.” The results of human activities would be an increase in heat waves, rainfall, drought, hurricanes, and high tides. The geoscientists at Princeton and Columbia have both acknowledged the danger of glacier melting and rising sea levels. They have estimated that if Greenland or the West Antarctic ice sheets melt, sea levels could rise by 20 feet (6 m). A series of map were created to show these devastating effects of future climate change and its result on sea levels. The maps display the changing coastlines of continents, countries and islands that will be affected by the estimated 6-meter rise in the world oceans.