Applications

Please find here the approved applications to the Social Art Award 2021 – New Greening. The open call was closed on 1 May.

The next Open Call for the Social Art Ward will be opened in early 2023.

 

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A view filmed through the window of a periscope: echo-...
by Sorcha Noble
135
Contest is finished!
https://social-art-award.org/application-award-2021?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=3351
23
135
Title:
A view filmed through the window of a periscope: echo-...

Author:
Sorcha Noble

Description:
A view filmed through the window of a periscope. Acoustic memory. (2020) Bat boxes, periscope, activist architectures. [Image 2: stills from the sculptural installation documented through film.] The installation involves four structures: three isolated ‘bat-box’ interiors(homes), a ‘periscope’ structure used as a frame of documentation. These objects, working in tandem, are built from Tanalised Pine wood, glass mirror, tactile transducers, and audio. Over the course of the durational installation, the film captures a view, directed by the frame of the mirrored reflection. Acoustics and acoustic memory is used in the investigation of inaccessible architectural spaces, such as human rights violations in prisons and the use of eco-profiling to retrieve information. The three ‘bat boxes’ are forms embedded with acoustic memory, re-found by eco-location. The objects are built in a way that the internal shape inside becomes important to the transformation of what is heard. The cross-channel audio invites engagement with stillness, altered by the echo-located architecture of each system; changing according to each object’s internal structure and its acoustic channelling of the sound. Providing space for new habitats and a possible contribution to conserving wildlife. The ‘periscope’ channels and records a direction of sight raised above ground, recalling the activist architectures of Claremont Road, London (1994), a methodological playground as a tactic to protect trees and social housing from demolition, and resist construction of the M11 motorway. The installation intertwines elements of these forms of power structures of space ownership, as well as referencing an architecture on a small scale that is being continuously recognised, navigated, and activated by echo-location. Social engagement through artistic practices encourage mutual learning, sharing resources for ecological and conservation practices; encouraging a consideration of speculative thought and conversations around how our city spaces could work differently. The work asks you to use auditory spatial awareness, closely listening and directing attention to an environment through an aural animist speculative architecture, in the hope to grow resilient cities. The sound-device objects derive from multiple designs of manufactured enclosures for bats to nest, providing important ecosystem services and biodiversity. Found in inner-city’s wild spaces in London’s Sydenham Hill Wood; intertwines a new architecture of conservation and ancient histories of the landscape and topology. Sydenham Hill Wood is a site of new and old woodland with remnants and ruins of 19th century private estates and a now disused rail tunnel. The woodland is now publicly accessible and used for community resources for wildlife conservation and ecological practices, and is an important spot for bat conservation through London wildlife Trust’s work, and therefore the bat’s habitats, and other hidden urban ecologies, become a possible role in the community alliance against development in that area and elsewhere.
Description:
A view filmed through the window of a periscope. Acoustic memory. (2020) Bat boxes, periscope, activist architectures. [Image 2: stills from the sculptural installation documented through film.] The installation involves four structures: three isolated ‘bat-box’ interiors(homes), a ‘periscope’ structure used as a frame of documentation. These objects, working in tandem, are built from Tanalised Pine wood, glass mirror, tactile transducers, and audio. Over the course of the durational installation, the film captures a view, directed by the frame of the mirrored reflection. Acoustics and acoustic memory is used in the investigation of inaccessible architectural spaces, such as human rights violations in prisons and the use of eco-profiling to retrieve information. The three ‘bat boxes’ are forms embedded with acoustic memory, re-found by eco-location. The objects are built in a way that the internal shape inside becomes important to the transformation of what is heard. The cross-channel audio invites engagement with stillness, altered by the echo-located architecture of each system; changing according to each object’s internal structure and its acoustic channelling of the sound. Providing space for new habitats and a possible contribution to conserving wildlife. The ‘periscope’ channels and records a direction of sight raised above ground, recalling the activist architectures of Claremont Road, London (1994), a methodological playground as a tactic to protect trees and social housing from demolition, and resist construction of the M11 motorway. The installation intertwines elements of these forms of power structures of space ownership, as well as referencing an architecture on a small scale that is being continuously recognised, navigated, and activated by echo-location. Social engagement through artistic practices encourage mutual learning, sharing resources for ecological and conservation practices; encouraging a consideration of speculative thought and conversations around how our city spaces could work differently. The work asks you to use auditory spatial awareness, closely listening and directing attention to an environment through an aural animist speculative architecture, in the hope to grow resilient cities. The sound-device objects derive from multiple designs of manufactured enclosures for bats to nest, providing important ecosystem services and biodiversity. Found in inner-city’s wild spaces in London’s Sydenham Hill Wood; intertwines a new architecture of conservation and ancient histories of the landscape and topology. Sydenham Hill Wood is a site of new and old woodland with remnants and ruins of 19th century private estates and a now disused rail tunnel. The woodland is now publicly accessible and used for community resources for wildlife conservation and ecological practices, and is an important spot for bat conservation through London wildlife Trust’s work, and therefore the bat’s habitats, and other hidden urban ecologies, become a possible role in the community alliance against development in that area and elsewhere.

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