Award 2019

The Open Call for the Social Art Award 2019 under the topic “We are the People – Peaceful Revolutions” was closed on December 15, 2019. We are very impressed by 558 submissions that were contributed by artists coming from 65 countries across all continents. 

The winners of The Social Art Award 2019 are Narcissa Gold (USA), Melinda Mouzannar (Lebanon) and Bogna Grazyna (Poland/Germany). The Honorary Mention goes to Kingson Kin Sing Chan (Hong Kong/UK). 

Below you find the artworks, that passed the initial jury round. The public voting took place till 30 December and is a tool to give more public visibility to the topic and the artworks. It does not replace the final jury judgment. There were two wildcards for the most voted artworks that entered the final shortlist

The focus diversity of applications shows that artists are active in the multi-faceted fields of socially engaged art reflecting on wars, genocides, femicides, traumata, violence against refugees, children, women, men, disabled people, LGBTIQs, animals. They share feelings for the planet and its living species, but also showing hopelessness due to complex crises be it climate change (e.g. in regard to water pollution), capitalism, corruption, a violation against human rights, nature, protected national parks. Many of the artists are constantly trying to give a voice to the poorest or empower unheard social groups.

It’s not only about peaceful revolutions, but it’s also about feeling a deep connection and showing love and respect for each other.
Thank you all for sharing your great and inspirational work and look at all the great contributions!

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59
The Repeated Refrains of Nature
by Shane Finan
Category: open category
3677
Contest is finished!
https://social-art-award.org/award2019?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=669
59
3677
Title:
The Repeated Refrains of Nature

Author:
Shane Finan

Category:
open category

Description:
The artwork was created in 2019 for exhibition at the Trinity College Dublin Zoological Museum. The artwork takes its name from a quote by Rachel Carson from her book, The Edge of the Sea: ‘There is something infinitely healing in these repeated refrains of nature, the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter.’ The Repeated Refrains of Nature is an interactive digital artwork that uses six video monitors to show videos of common garden birds feeding, presented much like a security control room multi-monitor setup. When a person enters the room, the birds fly off screen, leaving empty feeders. The artwork invites visitors to consider the human role on bird depopulation, exhibited among the extinct and endangered birds on show at the Trinity College Dublin Zoological Museum. Placed as it is, among other bird and animal species, the audience are asked to consider what a world without birds would be like. By remaining motionless, the birds may reappear, suggesting that reducing human action can also reduce the loss of species populations. Technology holds the artwork together as both monitor and controller. A video of the interactive artwork working can be viewed at https://youtu.be/l-mhVt8nnFo How can art catalyze change?: Interactive art requires audience participation, and as such creates an engagement that is more personal and socially challenging than traditional art forms. By asking people to alter their behaviour or perspective, art can influence new ways of thinking about being a citizen or an individual. This artwork (and my recent artworks) invite social change through a consideration of the individual actions that influence environmental or social change in a given area.
Description:
The artwork was created in 2019 for exhibition at the Trinity College Dublin Zoological Museum. The artwork takes its name from a quote by Rachel Carson from her book, The Edge of the Sea: ‘There is something infinitely healing in these repeated refrains of nature, the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter.’ The Repeated Refrains of Nature is an interactive digital artwork that uses six video monitors to show videos of common garden birds feeding, presented much like a security control room multi-monitor setup. When a person enters the room, the birds fly off screen, leaving empty feeders. The artwork invites visitors to consider the human role on bird depopulation, exhibited among the extinct and endangered birds on show at the Trinity College Dublin Zoological Museum. Placed as it is, among other bird and animal species, the audience are asked to consider what a world without birds would be like. By remaining motionless, the birds may reappear, suggesting that reducing human action can also reduce the loss of species populations. Technology holds the artwork together as both monitor and controller. A video of the interactive artwork working can be viewed at https://youtu.be/l-mhVt8nnFo How can art catalyze change?: Interactive art requires audience participation, and as such creates an engagement that is more personal and socially challenging than traditional art forms. By asking people to alter their behaviour or perspective, art can influence new ways of thinking about being a citizen or an individual. This artwork (and my recent artworks) invite social change through a consideration of the individual actions that influence environmental or social change in a given area.

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